Monique Bennett

Monique Bennett

Senior Researcher: Governance Insights & Analytics

Monique Bennett holds a Master’s degree in International Relations from the University of the Witwatersrand. Her interest in the field of data science and statistics was sparked by her quantitative methodology course during her studies. Her research focuses on development theory, governance, and the environment within the African context. She has written for news outlets such as the Daily Maverick and supports her research team by providing data-driven evidence for their research/op-eds. She has worked as a research assistant for In On Africa and as a public relations manager for the student organisation, Wits Inala Forum.

Dr Craig Moffat

Dr Craig Moffat

Head of Programme: Governance Delivery and Impact

Craig Moffat, PhD is the Head of Programme: Governance Delivery and Impact for Good Governance Africa. He has more than 17 years of practical experience working for government institutions and multilateral organisations. He was previously employed by the South African Foreign Service, where he worked extensively at identifying and analysing security threats towards South Africa as well as the southern Africa region. Previously, he was the political advisor for the Pretoria Regional Delegation of the International Committee of the Red Cross. He holds a PhD in Political Science from Stellenbosch University

Disentangling Violent Extremism in Cabo Delgado Province, Northern Mozambique: Challenges and Prospects

Published within the Extremisms in Africa anthology series, this chapter by Blessed Mangena and Dr Mokete Pherudi provides an overview of the origins of Ansar al-Sunnah in Cabo Delgado, including methods of recruitment the group uses and prospects for containment.
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Empowering Local Communities to Prevent Violent Extremism in Cabo Delgado, Mozambique

Published within the Extremisms in Africa anthology series, this chapter by Leigh Hamilton and Rami Sayed focuses on the spread of Islamist ideology to Mozambique, in particular its northern-most province of Cabo Delgado, detailing the erosion of civilian self-protection mechanisms in this region over the past two decades. It looks at strengthening self-protection as a novel way to empower local communities to prevent and counter extremism.

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Media Statement on the United States Presidential Election

US President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris deliver remarks in Wilmington, Delaware, on November 7, 2020, after being declared the winners of the presidential election. PHOTO Andrew Harnik /POOL/AFP

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

09/11/2020

This month’s presidential election in the United States has highlighted the vexing and universal conundrum of how to govern in the presence of deep disagreements in society.

This governance challenge stems from sharp cleavages in society, that, while in historical terms are not new, remain real and entrenched.

The mandate president-elect Joe Biden has received after the greatest voter turnout in 120 years in the United States must be seen by him as a mandate to govern through co-operation with various constituencies, and as a way of addressing fundamental injustices through a transformative agenda.

It is a strong endorsement to govern by consensus rather than to dominate through centralised, authoritarian practices. This would be in stark contrast to his predecessor’s autocratic approach which failed to resolve grievances but instead exploited them through populist rhetoric.

In the midst substantive criticism about fragility in the US governance system, GGA would argue that this electoral outcome and the strength of institutions of governance, presents us with a converse argument: that the United States’ democratic parameters are indeed robust, and that its electoral system is characterised by strong institutions and processes that act as checks and balances against the vagaries of populist and autocratic administrations.

The country’s founders built this protection into the constitution precisely to safeguard the American people against autocracy and tyranny.

The key takeout for Africa is that it is by governing with an interest in addressing legitimate grievances that true consensus is formed, which leads to greater peace and prosperity amongst the people and those who would govern.

Chris Maroleng

Executive Director

GGA SADC Africa

For further comment please contact:

Chris Maroleng: + 27 (0)73 274 6501/ chrism@gga.org

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