Anthony Turton
Anthony Turton is a professor at the Centre for Environmental Management, University of Free State. His work on water as a risk and opportunity grew out of his role as a senior intelligence officer in the South African Secret Service (SASS). He serves on the editorial board of various international publications, including Water Policy, the official journal of the World Water Council. He has previously served as executive director, and later vice president of the International Water Resource Association (IWRA), as well as a deputy governor of the WWC. His current work focuses on the water crisis in South Africa. He has been awarded the Royal Bank of Canada visiting scholarship to the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada for 2017/18.
Debunking the ‘water wars’ story

Debunking the ‘water wars’ story

Water is too important to fight over, but should instead be a vehicle for cooperation and nation-building In recent years, an idea has gained ground that Africa will face conflicts over its water, or so-called “water wars”, unless it can find ways to manage countries’ control of, and access to this most vital resource. But […]

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Anthony Turton
Anthony Turton is a professor at the Centre for Environmental Management, University of Free State. His work on water as a risk and opportunity grew out of his role as a senior intelligence officer in the South African Secret Service (SASS). He serves on the editorial board of various international publications, including Water Policy, the official journal of the World Water Council. He has previously served as executive director, and later vice president of the International Water Resource Association (IWRA), as well as a deputy governor of the WWC. His current work focuses on the water crisis in South Africa. He has been awarded the Royal Bank of Canada visiting scholarship to the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada for 2017/18.
Debunking the ‘water wars’ story

Debunking the ‘water wars’ story

Water is too important to fight over, but should instead be a vehicle for cooperation and nation-building In recent years, an idea has gained ground that Africa will face conflicts over its water, or so-called “water wars”, unless it can find ways to manage countries’...